Visiting Seongeup Folk Village (성읍민속마을) in Jeju island

A traditional house with thatched roof
A traditional house with thatched roof

During our holiday trip to Jeju island we got the chance to visit Seongeup Folk Village and saw how the Koreans lived 400 years ago. It really felt like stepping back into time and onto the set of one of the Korean Drama serials which I had been following on TV.

Lava rocks as walls around the houses
Lava rocks as walls around the houses

Each house had rock lava wall around it. There is no cement in between the rocks and they are just layered one on top of each other to make a fence. The rocks are porous so rain water will just flow through the fence and it will not be damaged if there was a typhoon.

The traditional layout of a homestead
The traditional layout of a homestead

There is a long walkway to the main house which is flanked by the outhouse and also the barnyard/ kitchen. Most of the villagers were farmers and they grew their own produce.

The tour guide for the day
The tour guide for the day

The English speaking tour guide that we had explained to us the area below was used to rear ducks and other livestock. In the olden days their toilet was outdoors and any human waste was used to fertilize the ground below.

The famous black pig
The famous black pig

A adult black pig which we saw in it’s pig pen. Black pig meat is very popular among the Koreans and we did get to taste it while on holiday in Jeju.

A traditional milling device
A traditional milling device

This was the traditional way which rice/ soya was grounded using a milling device shown above. The animal/human had to push the heavy stone and walk in circles around it while the seeds were being grounded into powder/paste.

A shot of Tiger girl and me outside a house.
A shot of Tiger girl and me outside a house.

I love the solid wooden doors that I saw at the entrance of this house and we had to take a shot for remembrance.

The guardians of Jeju island
The guardians of Jeju island

I found these statues around a lot of places in Jeju island. It is their God of fertility.  It is said if you rub the nose of the statue you will be blessed with a boy. If you rubbed the ear you would be blessed with a girl.  R and I stayed far away from the status as we both agree no more boys or girls for us. Three is enough.

Have you visited any traditional villages lately?

 

 

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47 thoughts on “Visiting Seongeup Folk Village (성읍민속마을) in Jeju island”

  1. That looks like an amazing place! We did go to some historical places in May. We saw where the Pilgrims landed in America and a couple other places in that same area.

  2. Hari OM
    Hey Dominique – that was a super trip!! I have been very fortunate to have visited many places such as this – perhaps the most famous that you may know of is Old Sydney Town in NSW Australia. There they also had folk playing the parts of residents – in character. We all tried to make them slip back into 20th century (as it was then), but they were all too expert for that!!! Nice pass on the idols by the way &*> YAM xx

  3. hahaha… your last paragraph is very cute!

    I thought you went on a free and easy trip

  4. Oh wow…what a wonderful thing to be able to see something that is a part of history…I love visiting places like this…will put this on my wish list of places to see…thanks for sharing. 🙂

  5. Wow! What a beautiful place to visit! When I was a kid, my family visited historical places in the US, it’s so neat to see how people lived in the past.

  6. It must have been a fun and very knowledge-feeding tour around this area. I have never been to any traditional places before but I should probably check some someday soon! I enjoyed the photos here.

  7. Wow Dominque! Thank you so much for that lesson on Korea! I bet that was an amazing holiday. Thank you for sharing and linking up with me! 🙂

  8. Fascinating! Growing up in Yorkshire, England, I learned about dry stone wall building. It is a skill, perhaps an art form, whereby the farmers build walls similar to the ones in your pictures. They don’t use cement; it’s a balancing act. Interesting how cultures so far apart come up with such similar solutions!

  9. south korea is so rich in history there’s always a story wherever you may go. i think it’s cool that you got to visit a traditional village just like the ones we see in historical dramas nowadays. they had it pretty then, huh? but they survived and even managed to make the most of what they had. i’d probably die early if i lived in that period. hehe!

  10. oh my goodness! I love going to places like this, whether it be history or just something so far fetched that makes you really appreciate what you have. Thank you for sharing this with us!

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